Liquid Sunshine

Written by Kayaker Chip on . Posted in The Erie Canal

Chip MacAlpine, Erie Canal, Kayaking, Sally Supernova, Wilderness Systems

This image doesn’t do justice to how hard it was raining for the first eight miles of paddling this morning. There was also a pretty thick fog and the wind kept shifting, headwind, tailwind, broadside. It just couldn’t make up its mind. Good thing I am used to the liquid sunshine from paddling around Oregon. With my paddling jacket on it really wasn’t too bad and just as the forecast predicted it cleared up around 4pm, so I wouldn’t have to setup camp and make dinner in the rain.

The couple of locations I had looked up this morning for camping tonight didn’t work out. more...

Camp Night One, Paddle Day Three

Written by Kayaker Chip on . Posted in The Erie Canal 10 Comments

Slept pretty good last night. No one, human or otherwise bothered me. Woke up at 7am to pouring rain, fog sweeping through the canal with a 7mph headwind. So I’ve been taking my time breaking camp, making breakfast and loading the boat back up. I tossed a small handful of blueberries from my yard that were dehydrated into some oatmeal and then attempted some potato pancakes while the berries rehydrated. Pancakes never really browned, but I did forget to pack some cooking oil and water wasn’t cutting it. I’ll try to grab some in the next town. And coffee. I guess I managed to consume my first weeks supply on the drive out from Oregon. more...

Low Bridge, Everybody Down!

Written by Kayaker Chip on . Posted in The Erie Canal

Chip MacAlpine, Erie Canal, Kayaking, Sally Supernova, Wilderness Systems

On the western end of the canal between Buffalo and Rochester there are sixteen lift bridges, there is on additional lift bridge in Fairport, just the other side of Rochester proper. The Erie Canal that exists today is not the same that was originally built in 1825, in fact it was enlarged twice. The first time between the years 1835 and 1862 and the second time in 1918. Each time, the canal was widened and deepened to allow larger cargo vessels and in some places the path was changed, abandoning the previous incarnation. More modern technologies in 1918, allowed the canal to overlap with natural waterways that could now be controlled with the locks, control gates, dams and diversions. more...

Misadventures on the Erie Canal – Day One

Written by Kayaker Chip on . Posted in The Erie Canal

So what does the start of the Erie Canal look like? Well, it was going to take me a couple extra miles of paddling the opposite direction to find out. Of course I did, in order to make it official!

New York State has a lot of information out on the web and in print, although most of it seems geared towards boats of the motorized variety. Docks and moorings sit high above the water where a motorboat can rope up and the crew can step from their vessel to dry land with ease, while a kayak stares on wondering how to get out. more...